Each of us comes equipped with an amazing pair of optical wonders. Even the Hubble telescope, which looks far out into distant galaxies, pales in comparison to the technology of the eye.

For many, vision fails as they get older. But despite what you may have been led to believe, this is not an inevitable part of aging.

Whether it’s the result of macular degeneration, cataracts, or glaucoma, vision loss is usually the result of not having enough “dye in your eye.” This “dye” not only helps you interpret the world around you, it also contains vitally important antioxidants that protect visual anatomy.

Just as there are many different colors of crayons, there are different types of eye dyes. These pigments fall into a chemical category known as xanthophylls – and cannot be preserved without proper nutrition.

You must get xanthophylls from your diet. Fortunately, food sources of xanthophylls are easy to find. Just load up on eggs, kale, spinach, turnip greens, collard greens, romaine lettuce, broccoli, zucchini, corn, garden peas, Brussels sprouts, and liver.

[Ed. Note: Shane Ellison is a two-time recipient of the prestigious Howard Hughes Medical Institute Research Grant for his research in biochemistry and physiology, and is a best-selling author. He holds a master’s degree in organic chemistry and has firsthand experience in drug design. Get the benefit of his knowledge and insight with his no-BS practical guide to living young naturally without dangerous, prescription drugs.]

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