Ask Yourself This… Is Your FAQ Page Making You Money?

Think your FAQ is one of those “admin” pages that just sit there on your website, quietly chugging along?

Nope!

Your FAQ page can actively attract traffic to your site, establish your credibility, and make sales for you. Here’s how…

1. Lure traffic to your site with your FAQ page.

Think about it. This is the perfect place to use your keywords. In fact, you can use those keywords in both the questions AND the answers to make the search engines really sit up and take notice.

2. Make visitors trust you so they’ll stick around to buy.

When you give visitors high-quality information, that tells them you’re both helpful and knowledgeable. Include questions and answers that show off your specialized knowledge so they will view you as an expert.

3. Ask your own questions.

Ask the questions you WISH people would ask – and then answer them in the same helpful, informative way you’ve answered all the others.

In your answers, quote legitimate product reviews whenever possible. Show quantifiable results. And, most important, explain the benefits of each feature you talk about.

4. Save time.

A well-written FAQ will save you countless hours answering individual questions.

With so many benefits, isn’t it time you took another look at your FAQ?

[Ed. Note: Get more expert advice about how to set up your website, make it attractive to customers and search engines alike, and start making sales as a member of ETR’s Internet Money Club. Get the details here.]

Comment on this article

  • Noel

    Ref: Derek Gehl’s article [3. Ask your own questions]

    Interesting collision of viewpoints between Gehl and that of Jakob Nielsen, usability guru:

    “Too many websites have FAQs that list questions the company wished users would ask. No good. FAQs have a simplistic information design that does not scale well. They must be reserved for frequently asked questions, since that’s the only thing that makes a FAQ a useful website feature. Infrequently asked questions undermine users’ trust in the website and damage their understanding of its navigation.”
    http://www.useit.com/alertbox/20021223.html