How to Boost Your Income

What do you see as your main role in your business? Are you the doer of the thing? Or the marketer of the thing? There is a HUGE difference between these two ways of thinking.

The attitude of the business owner as to what his or her role is has an enormous impact on how their time and resources are allocated. The doer of the thing is severely limiting business and income growth. The marketer of the thing has virtually unlimited income potential.

The fact of the matter is that unless you have an extremely rare talent like Picasso’s artistic ability, Stephen King’s ability to write best-selling horror novels, or the voice of Pavarotti, just about anybody can do the thing whether it’s landscaping, providing accounting and financial services, even things that require advanced degrees like dentistry.

Certainly the technical skills related to the delivery of a quality product or service matter but they are not nearly as important as creating a constant flow of people interested in exchanging money those products or services. That’s why so many “smart” and “talented” people are a bust in the business world. They see themselves as the doer of the thing, not the marketer of the thing. Like it or not, the fact is you can hire people to do those things (the doers) relatively cheaply.

The money is in marketing the thing and that’s where smart business owners focus their efforts. After all, your income is largely determined by the demand for the thing you provide whether it’s a product or a service. The more demand, the more money you’ll make. Increase the number of people that want to buy your widget and watch your income explode. Increase the number of people who want the benefits of the service you provide and see your income skyrocket.

You can always hire more “doers” – more mechanics, more architects, more bakers, more consultants, etc. Why do you think big accounting and consulting firms hire so many recent college graduates? Because they charge these new hires out at $200+ an hour and pay them $50 per hour. Consulting companies (at least the ones making the big bucks) understand the better they market their consulting services, the faster their income grows. They can always hire more doers.

This paradigm shift is very difficult for some doers to accept. They’ve invested a lot of time and effort into becoming the best doer of the thing. The best butcher, baker, or candlestick maker – jeweler, chef, or computer programmer. Many doers love the doing of the thing and despise marketing so much that they ignore or worse yet even outsource the marketing to someone that doesn’t even understand their business. It’s a recipe for disaster.

The most successful business owners understand the critical role of marketing. They understand the importance of acquiring, retaining, and maximizing the value of each customer and see this as their primary role. Not surprisingly, the business owner who makes this paradigm shift from the doer of the thing to the marketer of the thing instantly takes a quantum leap in income potential. And the more your customers and prospects get to know, like, and trust you, the brighter your business future.

[Ed. Note: Robert Phillips is the No-BW Copywriter at Glazer-Kennedy Inner Circle, an exclusive group of like-minded entrepreneurs, business people, and managers who want to increase their reach, maximize their profits and create for themselves a better, more rewarding lifestyle. Click here to access Glazer-Kennedy’s most incredible offer ever.]
  • Neil Sutton

    Thanks for this great article. I’m new to ETR, but have been trying to catch up, and ingest all of this great information and inspiration.

    Robert’s article really strikes a chord with some of the thoughts I’ve been struggling with in my own career. For the longest time, I’ve heard a similar categorization of “those who do” and “those who direct others on what to do.” For some reason that never seemed to define things completely for me, but I would let it guide my thoughts in my career path decisions. For years I have relentlessly pushed to be the best “doer” I could be, even though I was slowly (and reluctantly) moving more toward the management side of things. I was hesitant, because I felt that, in my career, it would mean more travel away from my family, as well as having to use a different set of tools that I wasn’t confident that I possessed.

    I believe Robert’s article has helped me to make a very necessary shift in my thinking, to help me move forward. Thanks again.

    • Craig Ballantyne

      Happy to help Neil, and thank you for your feedback. I’ll pass it on to Robert.

      Craig

  • Hey Craig et al.

    What’s the best way to find a mentor in the field of fitness training? I am a wanna be certified turbulence trainer but I’d love to have someone coach me through the marketing aspect of personal training. Thanks in advance!